SAT Reading Practice Tests

65mins

You have 65 minutes to finish the task.Your response will be judged on the quality of your writing and on how well your response presentsthe key points presented in the lectures

00:65:00

Passage 1

I have yet to meet a poetry-lover under thirty who was not an introvert, or an introvert who was not unhappy in adolescence. At school, particularly, maybe, if, as in my own case, it is a boarding school, he sees the extrovert successful, happy, and good and himself unpopular or neglected; and what is hardest to bear is not unpopularity, but the consciousness that it is deserved, that he is grubby and inferior and frightened and dull. Knowing no other kind of society than the contingent, he imagines that this arrangement is part of the eternal scheme of things, that he is doomed to a life of failure and envy. It is not till he grows up, till years later he runs across the heroes of his school days and finds them grown commonplace and sterile, that he realizes that the introvert is the lucky one, the best adapted to an industrial civilization the collective values of which are so infantile that he alone can grow, who has educated his fantasies and learned how to draw upon the resources of his inner life. At the time, however, his adolescence is unpleasant enough. Unable to imagine a society in which he would feel at home, he turns away from the human to the nonhuman: homesick he will seek, not his mother, but mountains or autumn woods, and the growing life within him will express itself in a devotion to music and thoughts upon mutability and death. Art for him will be something infinitely precious, pessimistic, and hostile to life. If it speaks of love it must be love frustrated, for all success seems to him noisy and vulgar; if it moralizes, it must counsel a stoic resignation, for the world he knows is well content with itself and will not change. Deep as first love and wild with all regret, O death in life, the days that are no more. Now more than ever seems it sweet to die To cease upon the midnight with no pain. That to the adolescent is the authentic poetic note and whoever is the first in his life to strike it, whether Tennyson, Keats, Swinburne, Housman or another, awakens a passion of imitation and an affectation which no subsequent refinement or sophistication of his taste can entirely destroy. In my own case it was Hardy in the summer of 1923; for more than a year I read no one else and I do not think that I was ever without one volume or another or the beautifully produced Wessex edition in my hands: I smuggled them into class, carried them about on Sunday walks, and took them up to the dormitory to read in the early morning, though they were far too unwieldy to be read in bed with comfort. In the autumn of 1924 there was a palace revolution after which he had to share his kingdom with Edward Thomas, until finally they were both defeated by Elliot at the battle of Oxford in 1926. Besides serving as the archetype of the Poetic, Hardy was also an expression of the contemporary scene. He was both my Keats and my Sandburg. To begin with, he looked like my father: that broad unpampered moustache, bald forehead, and deeply lined sympathetic face belonged to that other world of feeling and sensation. Here was a writer whose emotions, if sometimes monotonous and sentimental in expression, would be deeper and more faithful than my own, and whose attachment to the earth would be more secure and observant. Adapted from an article written by W H Auden


Question 1.
According to the author, poetry lovers under thirty generally

A. have a strong sense of their own inferiority during school years
B. are always products of boarding schools
C. have an unhappy home life
D. are outgoing as adolescents
E. long to return to early childhood

Question 2.
The authors main purpose is apparently to

A. describe what lead to his being an introvert
B. explore the reasons for his early taste in poetry
C. explain what lead to his becoming a poet
D. account for the unhappy adolescents aesthetic sense
E. criticize a system that makes young people feel unhappy and neglected

Question 3.
The word contingent most nearly means

A. juvenile
B. juvenile
C. Competitive
D. juvenile
E. inteligent

Question 4.
The author regards the introverted adolescent as ultimately lucky because he has
Question 3?

A. become financially successful in an industrialized society
B.ceased to envy others
C. cultivated inner resources that he will need in modern society
D. a better general education than those who were envied in school
E. learned to appreciate nature

Question 5.
To the adolescent the authentic poetic note is one of

A. pain and affirmation
B. hostility and vulgarity
C. contentment and peace
D. purity and love
E. melancholy and acceptance

Question 6.
It can be inferred that, for the author, the poetry of Hardy is
A. It can be inferred that, for the author, the poetry of Hardy is
B. a temporary interest soon supplanted by other poetry
C. a secret obsession that he is reluctant to confess
D. his first poetic love that time has not entirely erased
E. a childlike passion

Question 7.
The author uses all of the following to make his point except
A. metaphor
B. personal experience
C. generalization
D. classical allusions
E. comparison

Question 8.
The poetry quoted is most likely included as
A. extracts from the authors own poetry
B. extracts from Hardys poetry
C.examples of poetry that appeals to the unhappy adolescent
D. the type of poetry much admired by all poetry lovers
E. examples of schoolboy poetry

Question 9.
It can be inferred that Edward Thomas
A. was once held in high esteem by the author
B. was a better poet than Hardy
C. was writing in 1924
D. had views opposed to Eliot
E. wrote poetry similar to that of Hardy

Question 10.
The author mentions Carl Sandburg as
A. an example of a modern poet
B. an example of a traditional figure
C. having a poetic appearance
D. a poet to appeal to young people
E. resembling his father

Question 11.
The author qualifies his appreciation of Hardy by pointing out that Hardys poetic techniques were
A. sometimes unmoving
B. not always deeply felt
C. occasionally lacking in variety
D. always emotional
E. irrelevant to certain readers

Question 12.
The author feels that Hardys physical appearance suggested
A. deep and lasting feelings
B. paternal values
C. careworn old age
D. a contemporary writer
E. fatherly concern


Passage 2

I chose to wander by Bethlehem Hospital; partly, because it lay on my road round to Westminster; partly, because I had a fancy in my head which could be best pursued within sight of its walls. And the fancy was: Are not the sane and the insane equal at night as the sane lie a dreaming? Are not all of us outside this hospital, who dream, more or less in the condition of those inside it, every night of our lives? Are we not nightly persuaded, as they daily are, that we associate preposterously with kings and queens, and notabilities of all sorts? Do we not nightly jumble events and personages and times and places, as these do daily? Said an afflicted man to me, when I visited a hospital like this, Sir, I can frequently fly. I was half ashamed to reflect that so could I - by night. I wonder that the great master, when he called Sleep the death of each days life, did not call Dreams the insanity of each days sanity.
Passage adapted from: The Uncommercial Traveller, C Dickens (1860)


Question 13.
It can be correctly inferred that Bethlehem hospital
I is very close to Westminster
II has patients who are regarded as insane
III is a place the author has visited before
A. I only
B. II only
C. III only
D. I and II
E. I, II and III

Question 14.
The author makes his point with the aid of all of the following except
A. rhetorical questions.
B. personal anecdote.
C. allusion.
D. frequent use of metaphor.
E. repetition and parallel construction.


Passage 3

Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts.
Passage adapted from: Politics And The English Language, George Orwell


Question 15.
The example of the man who takes to drink is used to illustrate which of the following ideas in the paragraph?
A. foolish thoughts
B. the slovenliness of language
C. political and economic causes
D. an effect becoming a cause
E. bad influences

Question 16.
The author would most likely agree that
A. individual writers can never have a bad influence on the English language.
B. imprecise use of language is likely to make precise thought more difficult.
C. the English language is ugly and inaccurate.
D. all language declines for political reasons.
E. failure generally leads to more failure in a downward spiral.


Passage 4

All the sound reasons ever given for conserving other natural resources apply to the conservation of wildlife and with three-fold power. When a spendthrift squanders his capital it is lost to him and his heirs; yet it goes somewhere else. When a nation allows any one kind of natural resource to be squandered it must suffer a real, positive loss; yet substitutes of another kind can generally be found. But when wildlife is squandered it does not go elsewhere, like squandered money; it cannot possibly be replaced by any substitute, as some inorganic resources are: it is simply an absolute, dead loss, gone beyond even the hope of recall.

The public still has a hazy idea that Nature has an overflowing sanctuary of her own, somewhere or other, which will fill up the gaps automatically. The result is that poaching is commonly regarded as a venial offence, poachers taken red-handed are rarely punished, and willing ears are always lent to the cry that rich sportsmen are trying to take the bread out of the poor settler's mouth. The poor settler does not reflect that he himself, and all other classes alike, really have a common interest in the conservation of any wildlife that does not conflict with legitimate human development.
Both passages adapted from: Animal Sanctuaries in Labrador, W Wood (1911)


Question 17.
The author of paragraph one probably uses the expression three-fold power
A. because there are three-times as many reasons for conserving wildlife.
B. to be more dramatic that saying double-power.
C. to emphasize the contrast between loss of money, loss of other resources, and loss of wildlife.
D. to stress the need for saving money, resources and time.
E. to indicate the magnitude of the problem without intending the expression to be taken literally.

Question 18.
From the context, the word venial in paragraph two most nearly means
A. major.
B. Criminal.
C. Frequent.
D. Trivial.
E. Natural

Question 19.
Both paragraphs apparently imply that
A. there is no source from which wildlife, once exterminated, can be replaced.
B. poachers must be punished.
C. wildlife has much in common with other natural resources
D. conservation is in conflict with human development.
E. preserving wildlife is expensive

Question 20.
It can be inferred that the spendthrift in paragraph one and the poor settler mentioned in paragraph two are alike in that they are
A. in conflict with the aims of conservation.
B. inclined to waste natural resources.
C. more concerned with the present than the future
D. unable to control their spending
E. unaware of conservation

Passage 5

I chose to wander by Bethlehem Hospital; partly, because it lay on my road round to Westminster; partly, because I had a fancy in my head which could be best pursued within sight of its walls. And the fancy was: Are not the sane and the insane equal at night as the sane lie a dreaming? Are not all of us outside this hospital, who dream, more or less in the condition of those inside it, every night of our lives? Are we not nightly persuaded, as they daily are, that we associate preposterously with kings and queens, and notabilities of all sorts? Do we not nightly jumble events and personages and times and places, as these do daily? Said an afflicted man to me, when I visited a hospital like this, Sir, I can frequently fly.I was half ashamed to reflect that so could I - by night. I wonder that the great master, when he called Sleep the death of each days life, did not call Dreams the insanity of each days sanity.
Passage adapted from: The Uncommercial Traveller, C Dickens (1860)


Question 21.
It can be correctly inferred that Bethlehem hospital
I is very close to Westminster
II has patients who are regarded as insane
III is a place the author has visited before
A. I only.
B. II only.
C. III only.
D. I and II only.
E. I, II and III

Question 22.
The author makes his point with the aid of all of the following except
A. rhetorical questions.
B. personal anecdote.
C. allusion.
D. frequent use of metaphor.
E. repetition and parallel construction

Passage 6

Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts.
Passage adapted from: Politics And The English Language, George Orwell


Question 23.
The example of the man who takes to drink is used to illustrate which of the following ideas in the paragraph?
A. foolish thoughts.
B. the slovenliness of language.
C. political and economic causes.
D. an effect becoming a cause.
E. bad influences.

Question 24.
The author would most likely agree that
A. individual writers can never have a bad influence on the English language.
B. imprecise use of language is likely to make precise thought more difficult.
C. the English language is ugly and inaccurate.
D. all language declines for political reasons.
E. failure generally leads to more failure in a downward spiral.


Passage 7

All the sound reasons ever given for conserving other natural resources apply to the conservation of wildlife � and with three-fold power. When a spendthrift squanders his capital it is lost to him and his heirs; yet it goes somewhere else. When a nation allows any one kind of natural resource to be squandered it must suffer a real, positive loss; yet substitutes of another kind can generally be found. But when wildlife is squandered it does not go elsewhere, like squandered money; it cannot possibly be replaced by any substitute, as some inorganic resources are: it is simply an absolute, dead loss, gone beyond even the hope of recall.
The public still has a hazy idea that Nature has an overflowing sanctuary of her own, somewhere or other, which will fill up the gaps automatically. The result is that poaching is commonly regarded as a venial offence, poachers taken red-handed are rarely punished, and willing ears are always lent to the cry that rich sportsmen are trying to take the bread out of the poor settler's mouth. The poor settler does not reflect that he himself, and all other classes alike, really have a common interest in the conservation of any wildlife that does not conflict with legitimate human development.
Both passages adapted from: Animal Sanctuaries in Labrador, W Wood (1911)

Question 25
The author of paragraph one probably uses the expression three-fold power

A. because there are three-times as many reasons for conserving wildlife
B. to be more dramatic that saying double-power
C. to emphasize the contrast between loss of money, loss of other resources, and loss of wildlife
D. to stress the need for saving money, resources and time
E. to indicate the magnitude of the problem without intending the expression to be taken literally

Question 26.
From the context, the word venial in paragraph two most nearly means

A. major
B. criminal
C. frequent
D. trival
E. natural

Question 27.
Both paragraphs apparently imply that

A. there is no source from which wildlife, once exterminated, can be replaced
B. poachers must be punished
C. wildlife has much in common with other natural resources
D. conservation is in conflict with human development
E. preserving wildlife is expensive

Question 28.
It can be inferred that the spendthrift in paragraph one and the poor settler mentioned in paragraph two are alike in that they are

A. in conflict with the aims of conservation
B. inclined to waste natural resources
C. more concerned with the present than the future
D. unable to control their spending
E. unaware of conservation

Passage 8

The ground is full of seeds that cannot rise into seedlings; the seedlings rob one another of air, light and water, the strongest robber winning the day, and extinguishing his competitors. Year after year, the wild animals with which man never interferes are, on the average, neither more nor less numerous than they were; and yet we know that the annual produce of every pair is from one to perhaps a million young; so that it is mathematically certain that, on the average, as many are killed by natural causes as are born every year, and those only escape which happen to be a little better fitted to resist destruction than those which die. The individuals of a species are like the crew of a foundered ship, and none but good swimmers have a chance of reaching the land.
Adapted from an essay by T H Huxley

Question 29.
The robber in the first sentence is most like which of the following mentioned in the paragraph

A. wild animals
B. produce of every pair
C. individuals of a species
D. crew of a foundered ship
E. good swimmers

Question 30.
The main point the author conveys is that

A. natural populations of animals in the wild increase in numbers exponentially
B. all members of a species are in violent competition with one another
C. in the struggle to survive, the fittest survive
D. members of one generation of a population are all more or less alike
E. mans interference destroys the natural balance

Passage 9

When the explorer comes home victorious, everyone goes out to cheer him. We are all proud of his achievement proud on behalf of the nation and of humanity. We think it is a new feather in our cap, and one we have come by cheaply. How many of those who join in the cheering were there when the expedition was fitting out, when it was short of bare necessities, when support and assistance were most urgently wanted? Was there then any race to be first? At such a time the leader has usually found himself almost alone; too often he has had to confess that his greatest difficulties were those he had to overcome at home before he could set sail. So it was with Columbus, and so it has been with many since his time.
Amundsen has always reached the goal he has aimed at, this man who sailed his little yacht over the Arctic Ocean, round the north of America, on the course that had been sought in vain for four hundred years. So, when in 1910 he left the fjord on his expedition in the Fram, to drift right across the North Polar Sea, would it not have been natural if we had been proud to support such a man? But was it so? For a long time he struggled to complete his equipment. Money was still lacking, and little interest was shown in him and his work. He himself gave everything he possessed in the world. But nevertheless had to put to sea loaded with anxieties and debts, as he sailed out quietly on a summer night.
Adapted from the introduction by Fridtjof Nansen to The South Pole, R Amundsen (1912)

Question 31.
In paragraph one, the �race to be first refers ironically to the

A. lack of response to urgent appeals for help
B. willingness to give credit
C. lack of support to the explorer before he achieves his goals
D. rush to laud the explorer
E. eagerness of the explorer to be alone

Question 32.
The feather in our cap refers to

A. our willingness to take unearned credit for a triumph
B. the pride we have in being human
C. our sense of having got a reward for our investment
D. way we respond to all success
E. the way we express our joy

Question 33.
Both paragraphs make their point with the aid of

A. repetition and parallel construction
B. specific details of time and place
C. metaphor
D. reference to historical documents
E. rhetorical questions

Question 34.
From both paragraphs taken together, it appears that Amundsen and Columbus shared all of the following except the fact that they

A. were explorers
B. were not always supported when they most needed it
C. achieved feats that should have received accolades
D. had difficulties to face apart from those they faced on their expeditions
E. sailed the seas alone

Passage 10

Much of what goes by the name of pleasure is simply an effort to destroy consciousness. If one started by asking, what is man? what are his needs? how can he best express himself? one would discover that merely having the power to avoid work and live one�s life from birth to death in electric light and to the tune of tinned music is not a reason for doing so. Man needs warmth, society, leisure, comfort and security: he also needs solitude, creative work and the sense of wonder. If he recognized this he could use the products of science and industrialism eclectically, applying always the same test: does this make me more human or less human? He would then learn that the highest happiness does not lie in relaxing, resting, playing poker, drinking and making love simultaneously.
Examine the recently laid egg of some common animal, such as a salamander or newt. It is a minute spheroid � an apparently structureless sac, enclosing a fluid, holding granules in suspension. But let a moderate supply of warmth reach its watery cradle, and the plastic matter undergoes changes so rapid, yet so steady and purposeful in their succession, that one can only compare them to those operated by a skilled modeler upon a formless lump of clay. As with an invisible trowel, the mass is divided and subdivided into smaller and smaller portions. And, then, it is as if a delicate finger traced out the line to be occupied by the spinal column, and molded the contour of the body; pinching up the head at one end, the tail at the other, and fashioning flank and limb into due proportions, in so artistic a way, that, after watching the process hour by hour, one is almost involuntarily possessed by the notion, that some more subtle aid to vision than a microscope, would show the hidden artist, with his plan before him, striving with skilful manipulation to perfect his work.
There are not many places that I find it more agreeable to revisit when in an idle mood, than some places to which I have never been. For, my acquaintance with those spots is of such long standing, and has ripened into an intimacy of so affectionate a nature, that I take a particular interest in assuring myself that they are unchanged. I never was in Robinson Crusoes Island, yet I frequently return there. I was never in the robbers cave, where Gil Blas lived, but I often go back there and find the trap-door just as heavy to raise as it used to be. I was never in Don Quixotes study, where he read his books of chivalry until he rose and hacked at imaginary giants, yet you couldn't move a book in it without my knowledge. So with Damascus, and Lilliput, and the Nile, and Abyssinia, and the North Pole, and many hundreds of places I was never at them, yet it is an affair of my life to keep them intact, and I am always going back to them.
The books one reads in childhood create in one's mind a sort of false map of the world, a series of fabulous countries into which one can retreat at odd moments throughout the rest of life, and which in some cases can even survive a visit to the real countries which they are supposed to represent. The pampas, the Amazon, the coral islands of the Pacific, Russia, land of birch-tree and samovar, Transylvania with its boyars and vampires, the China of Guy Boothby, the Paris of du Maurier�one could continue the list for a long time. But one other imaginary country that I acquired early in life was called America. If I pause on the word America, and deliberately put aside the existing reality, I can call up my childhood vision of it.
Adapted from an essay by George Orwell

Question 35.
The author implies that the answers to the questions in sentence two would reveal that human beings

A. are less human when they seek pleasure
B. need to evaluate their purpose in life
C. are being alienated from their true nature by technology
D. have needs beyond physical comforts
E. are always seeking the meaning of life

QUESTION 36.
The author would apparently agree that playing poker is

A. often an effort to avoid thinking
B. something that gives true pleasure
C. an example of man�s need for society
D. something that man must learn to avoid
E. inhuman

QUESTION 37
The author makes his main point with the aid of

A. logical paradox
B. complex rationalization
C. observations on the connection between art and science
D. scientific deductions
E. extended simile

QUESTION 38
In the context of the final sentence the word �subtle� most nearly means

A. not obvious
B. indirect
C. discriminating
D. surreptitious
E. scientific

QUESTION 39
The first sentence of passage one contains an element of

A. paradox
B. legend
C. melancholy
D. humor
E. self-deprecation

QUESTION 40
By calling America an imaginary country the author of passage two implies that

A. America has been the subject of numerous works for children
B. he has never seen America
C. his current vision of that country is not related to reality
D. America has stimulated his imagination
E. his childhood vision of that country owed nothing to actual conditions

QUESTION 41
Both passages make the point that

A. imaginary travel is better than real journeys
B. children's books are largely fiction
C. the effects of childhood impressions are inescapable
D. books read early in life can be revisited in the imagination many years later
E. the sight of imaginary places evokes memories

QUESTION 42
Both passages list a series of places, but differ in that the author of passage one

A. has been more influenced by his list of locations
B. never expects to visit any of them in real life, whereas the writer of passage two thinks it at least possible that he might
C. is less specific in compiling his list
D. wishes to preserve his locations in his mind forever, whereas the author of passage two wishes to modify all his visions in the light of reality.
E. revisits them more often

best ielts coaching centers in hyderabad ameerpet best ielts coaching centers in hyderabad reviews| best ielts coaching centers in hyderabad yahoo answers| best ielts coaching centres in Hyderabad| best ielts coaching in Hyderabad| best ielts coaching in hyderabad ameerpet| best ielts coaching in hyderabad dilsukhnagar| best ielts coaching in hyderabad kukatpally| best ielts coaching institutes in Hyderabad| best institutes for ielts coaching in Hyderabad| coaching centers in hyderabad for ielts| coaching centres for ielts in Hyderabad| coaching for ielts in Hyderabad| cost of ielts coaching in Hyderabad| fee for ielts coaching in Hyderabad| free ielts coaching centers in Hyderabad| free ielts coaching centres in Hyderabad| free ielts coaching in Hyderabad| good ielts coaching center in Hyderabad| gre and ielts coaching in Hyderabad| gre toefl ielts coaching centers in Hyderabad| idp ielts coaching centers in Hyderabad| ielts and toefl coaching centres in Hyderabad| ielts and toefl coaching in Hyderabad| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad abids| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad ameerpet| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad banjara hills| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad dilsukhnagar| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad ecil| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad himayat nagar| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad kukatpally| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad madhapur| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad mehdipatnam| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad panjagutta| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad reviews| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad secunderabad| ielts coaching centers in hyderabad tarnaka| ielts coaching centers in sr nagar Hyderabad| ielts coaching centre Hyderabad| ielts coaching centre in hyderabad abids| ielts coaching centre in hyderabad gachibowli| ielts coaching centres in mehdipatnam Hyderabad| ielts coaching cost in Hyderabad| ielts coaching in Hyderabad| ielts coaching in hyderabad abids| ielts coaching in hyderabad alwal| ielts coaching in hyderabad ameerpet| ielts coaching in hyderabad british council| ielts coaching in hyderabad chandanagar| ielts coaching in hyderabad ecil| ielts coaching in hyderabad fee| ielts coaching in hyderabad fees| ielts coaching in hyderabad gachibowli| ielts coaching in hyderabad himayat nagar| ielts coaching in hyderabad india| ielts coaching in hyderabad justdial| ielts coaching in hyderabad kphb| ielts coaching in hyderabad kukatpally| ielts coaching in hyderabad madhapur| ielts coaching in hyderabad malakpet| ielts coaching in yderabad mehdipatnam| ielts coaching in hyderabad miyapur| ielts coaching in hyderabad panjagutta| ielts coaching in hyderabad tarnaka| ielts coaching in hyderabad uppal| ielts coaching in hyderabad with fee ielts coaching institutes in Hyderabad| ielts coaching jobs in Hyderabad| ielts coaching price in hyderabad| ielts exam coaching centers in Hyderabad| ielts general coaching centers in Hyderabad| ielts general coaching in Hyderabad| ielts general training coaching in Hyderabad| ielts idp coaching in Hyderabad| ielts in hyderabad dates| ielts in hyderabad india| ielts in hyderabad sindh| ielts online coaching in Hyderabad| ielts preparation in hyderabad sindh| ielts training dilsukhnagar Hyderabad| ielts training hyderabad india| ielts training in kphb Hyderabad| ielts training institute Hyderabad| jeevas ielts coaching centers in Hyderabad| list of ielts coaching centres in Hyderabad| list of ielts coaching classes in Hyderabad| princeton ielts coaching in Hyderabad| top 10 ielts coaching centers in Hyderabad| top 10 ielts coaching centres in Hyderabad| top 10 ielts coaching in Hyderabad| top ielts coaching centres in Hyderabad| top ielts coaching in Hyderabad| top institutes for ielts coaching in Hyderabad| visu ielts coaching centers in Hyderabad| visu ielts coaching in Hyderabad academic writing practice ielts free download| canada visa ielts free practice tests| download free ielts practice books| download free ielts practice test plus| download free ielts practice test plus 2| download free ielts practice test reading| free cambridge ielts practice materials| free download barron's ielts practice exams| free download official ielts practice materials| free general ielts practice course| free ielts full practice test| free ielts general listening practice test| free ielts general module practice test| free ielts general practice material| free ielts general practice test download| free ielts general writing practice| free ielts general writing practice test| free ielts grammar practice test| free ielts listening exam practice| free ielts listening practice 2014| free ielts listening practice examples| free ielts listening practice material| free ielts listening practice test 2011| free ielts listening practice test 2012| free ielts listening practice test general training| free ielts listening practice test pdf| free ielts listening practice videos| free ielts official practice materials| free ielts practice activities and resources| free ielts practice Australia| free ielts practice book pdf| free ielts practice british council| free ielts practice Canada| free ielts practice exercises| free ielts practice for general training| free ielts practice for writing| free ielts practice general module| free ielts practice general reading test| free ielts practice guides and advice| free ielts practice lessons| free ielts practice material online| free ielts practice online| free ielts practice reading material| free ielts practice resources| free ielts practice software| free ielts practice software download| free ielts practice test 2011| free ielts practice test 2012| free ielts practice test 2014| free ielts practice test books| free ielts practice test uts| free ielts practice test video| free ielts practice tests 2013| free ielts practice websites| free ielts practice writing topics| free ielts practice youtube| free ielts reading practice pdf| free ielts reading practice test download| free ielts reading practice test general training| free ielts reading practice test online| free ielts reading practice test pdf| free ielts reading practice test with answers| free ielts reading practice test with answers pdf.| free ielts speaking practice online| free ielts speaking practice software| free ielts speaking practice video| free ielts vocabulary practice| free ielts writing practice pdf download| free ielts writing practice test general| free ielts writing task 1 practice| free official ielts practice materials| free online ielts practice course| free pdf for ielts practice test| free practice ielts general exam| free practice material for ielts| free practice of ielts listening| free practice test for ielts reading| general ielts free practice| general ielts free practice tests| general reading ielts free practice tests| general training ielts free practice tests| ielts academic exam practice free| ielts blog free practice| ielts essentials free practice tests| ielts free cambridge practice tests| ielts free cambridge practice tests download| ielts free download practice material| ielts free download practice test| ielts free listening practice download| ielts free listening practice samples| ielts free listening practice test with answers| ielts free online practice listening tests| ielts free online practice materials| ielts free practice academic tests| ielts free practice book| ielts free practice books download| ielts free practice course| ielts free practice download| ielts free practice exams| ielts free practice for Australia| ielts free practice general test| ielts free practice listening| ielts free practice listening test download| ielts free practice listening tests online| ielts free practice material| ielts free practice material academic| ielts free practice material download| ielts free practice material for general| ielts free practice materials download| ielts free practice online| ielts free practice papers| ielts free practice pdf| ielts free practice questions| ielts free practice reading| ielts free practice set| ielts free practice speaking| ielts free practice test| ielts free practice test for listening| ielts free practice test free download| ielts free practice test general training| ielts free practice test idp| ielts free practice test listening| ielts free practice test pdf| ielts free practice test reading| ielts free practice test speaking| ielt s free practice tests academic Canada| ielts free practice tests academic listening| ielts free practice tests academic online| ielts free practice tests academic pdf| ielts free practice tests academic reading| ielts free practice tests general| ielts free practice tests general training| ielts free practice tests with answer key| ielts free practice videos| ielts free practice writing test| ielts free practice zone| ielts free practise videos| ielts free reading practice tests general| ielts free review practice| ielts free sample practice test| ielts free writing practice| ielts free writing practice sample| ielts listening practice free youtube| ielts practice books free download| ielts practice books free download pdf| ielts practice cd free download| ielts practice materials 2 free download| ielts practice materials 2012 free download| ielts practice materials free download pdf| ielts practice now free download| ielts practice online free uk| ielts practice plus 2 free download| ielts practice plus 3 free download| ielts practice software exe free download| ielts practice test 2012 free download| ielts practice test 6 free download| ielts practice test 8 free download| ielts practice test academic free download| ielts practice test book free download| ielts practice test free download pdf| ielts practice test software free download| ielts practice video free download| reading comprehension free ielts practice test| www.free ielts practice materials| www.ielts free practice.com|